Black women dating outside their race

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The headline began, “Unlike New Bachelorette Rachel Lindsay, Black Women…” Twitter immediately commenced dragging the story, accusing the publication of feeding into stereotypes about Black women.

Earlier today the publication retracted the article and issued an apology, as reported by the Washington Free Beacon.

Several of us open to love in any color have found supportive resources (i.e.

Facebook or Meetup groups, interracial dating sites, etc) in our quest for character over color.

So while it should certainly make headlines that Lindsay is Black, her racial preferences — or lack thereof — on the other hand, should not.

This did not stop one publication from running a story that low-key lauded Lindsay for her choice to associate with white men, mainly because it counters data that revealed Black women are less likely to date outside of their race.

Another of my male relatives brought home a woman for Christmas who seemed like a modern-day, socially progressive southern belle.

“The pressures that I feel about being a black woman and what that is... The show exposes the fraught dynamics of race, dating, and marriage for black women in America. in my mind ‘bachelorettes’ were white women who were brides-to-be or bridesmaids in their best friends’ weddings, throwing parties to celebrate the end of their spinsterhood,” writes Robin Boylorn for in the 1900s, most black adults were married.

However, many contemporary black women—especially those who come of age in the inner city—are unmarried and often lack modeling for what a healthy African American marriage looks like.

This is a pattern that I have observed in my professional life for years: successful black men pairing up with white women, but now that the practice has come home to roost, so to speak, I cannot help but admit to feeling a bit demoralized.

Black people is a term used in certain countries, often in socially based systems of racial classification or of ethnicity, to describe persons who are perceived to be dark-skinned compared to other given populations.

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